health

The Poodle is generally a healthy breed with a few concerns to watch for:

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) is an inherited disease of the retina (the “film in the camera”) in dogs, in which the rod cells in the retina are programmed to die. PRA occurs in both eyes simultaneously and is nonpainful. There are many different types of inherited retinal degenerative diseases in purebred dogs, and discussing these are beyond the scope of this article. PRA occurs in most breeds of dogs and also occurs in mixed breeds. more…

 

Urolithiasis, Struvite in Dogs

Urolithiasis is the medical term referring to the presence of stones in the kidneys, bladder or anywhere in the urinary tract. Struvite — the primary composition of these stones — is a material that is comprised of magnesium, ammonium and phosphate. The stones are more common in female dogs than in male dogs, and typically in animals that are mid-range in years (six to seven years of age). Struvite stones account for more than one-third of all stones found in the urinary tracts of dogs. more…

 

 

Degenerative Myelopathy

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a spontaneously occurring, adult-onset spinal cord disorder that affects dogs,and is similar to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease in humans (1). With DM, there isdegeneration of the “white matter” of the spinal cord and the peripheral nerves. The white matter tracts of the spinalcord contain fibers that transmit movement commands from the brain to the limbs and sensory information from thelimbs to the brain. Although the disease is common in several breeds, including German Shepherd Dogs, Corgis, Boxers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, and Standard Poodles, it can occur in other breeds andmixed-breed dogs as well. The typical age of onset is between 8-14 years of age, and both sexes are equallyaffected. It is a genetic disorder: A genetic mutation has been identified that is a major risk factor for development of DM. Therefore, breeders would do well to take into account DM when establishing their breeding programs. DM, on its own, is not a painful disease. However, compensatory movements for a weak hind end can cause the dog to develop pain in other areas of his body such as his neck, shoulders, and front limbs. more...

Von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD)

vWD is caused by a lack of von Willebrand factor which is a protein that plays a key role in the blood clotting process resulting in prolonged bleeding. The disorder occurs in varying degrees of severity ranging from trivial bleeding to excessive life threatening haemorrhages. Symptoms include spontaneous bleeding from the nose, gum and other mucous membranes. Excessive bleeding occurs after an injury, trauma or a surgery. Often dogs don’t show clinical signs until something starts the bleeding, such as nail trimming, teething, spaying, sterilizing, tail docking, cropping or other causes. Bleeding also occurs internally in the stomach, intestines, urinary tracts, genitals and / or into the joints. Doberman is the highest risk in vWD; frequencies of carrier and affected being 49% and 26%, respectively. About 1% and 9% of Poodles are affected by and carrier of vWD. more…

Addison’s disease

Addison’s disease is (as of 20 August 2007) the illness most commonly reported to the Poodle Health Registry. The number of reported cases is nearly twice as high as the next most common problem (GDV). Addison’s disease is characterized by insufficient production of glucocorticoid and/or mineralocortoid in the adrenal cortex (near the kidneys). Addison’s is often undiagnosed because early symptoms are vague and easily mistaken for other conditions. Standard Poodles with unexplained lethargy, frequent gastric disturbances, or an inability to tolerate stress should be tested for it. Addison’s can cause fatal sodium/potassium imbalances, but if caught early and treated with lifelong medication, most dogs can live a relatively normal life. more..

Cushing’s syndrome, also called hyperadrenocorticism, occurs when your dog’s adrenal glands produce too much cortisol, an essential hormone released in response to stress. While cortisol is needed for normal bodily functions, too much cortisol can cause serious health consequences.
The majority of of all Cushing’s syndrome cases (80% to 85%) are caused by a small, benign tumor located in the pituitary gland, found at the base of the brain. This noncancerous tumor produces a hormone that stimulates the adrenal glands to enlarge and produce too much cortisol.In the remaining 15% to 20% of dogs with Cushing’s, the cause is a malignant tumor affecting one of the adrenal glands, causing the gland to produce too much cortisol.In some cases, Cushing’s syndrome can be caused by the long-term use of steroid medications (e.g. prednisone) to treat many conditions such as allergies, inflammation, and autoimmune disease. more..

Gastric dilatation volvulus

There is a high incidence of gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV) in this breed, which occurs when twisting of the stomach (volvulus or torsion) causes or is caused by excess gas. Symptoms include restlessness, inability to get comfortable, pacing, or retching without being able to bring up anything. The dog’s abdomen may be visibly swollen, but bloat or torsion can occur without visible swelling. A dog with GDV requires immediate veterinary care. The dog’s survival usually depends on whether the owner can get to a veterinarian in time. GDV risk is increased with faster eating and a raised feeding bowl. more…

 

 

Regular grooming is an important part of responsible dog care… more...